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Project Based Learning: Yearbook Project

What is Project-Based Learning?

Project-Based Learning (PBL) is a learning method in which students are actively engaging in real-world and personally meaningful projects. Three days a week, Maharishi School students are given 70 minutes to work on a passion project. They problem-solve, experiment, falter and keep striving. Each project addresses an authentic, engaging and complex question or challenge. The students exercise real-life skills in their areas of interest while being supported by teachers. Often a community expert or leader on that subject is brought in to match the students’ interests.

What about bringing back the yearbook? 

front of maharishi school 2020

Maharishi School had a yearbook in the past and the desire to reinstate a yearbook was something that Ms. Blitz proposed to her students. “The yearbook, on top of building STEM and design skills, has served as a social bonding agent in our students as they’ve worked together creating, collaging, and reliving memories,” explained Ms. Blitz. The students included in this project period are; Vaisnavii Mohanraj, Jeremy Goodale, Lily Fenton and Ryan Buhre.

What did they learn in this project-based learning project?

During this process of creating a yearbook Ms. Blitz taught the students how to write HTML and CSS code. Throughout the project they had to problem solve and address challenges that arose. Programming requires an increased attention to

high school yearbook collage made by the students

detail, as one student reflected, “I found that doing the task was challenging because I made some small errors in my code (e.g. forgetting to close a tag, forgetting to use a ‘;’ after CSS properties, and so forth). These mistakes have taught me that looking over your code is a crucial step in coding.” The students also experienced working within company design standards, a typical industry practice. The yearbook was created to fit preset color palettes and fonts as set by Maharishi School’s branding guidelines. Exposure to industry standard practices such as this is one of the benefits of having PBL at Maharishi School because of the customization of the curriculum to any specific project.

What can the students do with this knowledge?

In the bigger picture of working with computers, knowing how to insert pictures, use CSS properties, and HTML basics will be important in web development. Because of project-based learning, these students will be able to use the concepts to create posters, 10th grade students at Maharishi School webpages, or further help design within the school. They’re learning skills that can be used for design projects of any company that they choose to work with in the future. PBL is important because the students become directors and managers of their learning process, mentored by a skilled teacher.

If you are interested in purchasing a yearbook or if you have any additional inquiries about the yearbook, please contact Sophia Blitz, sblitz@maharishischool.org. Please note that there is a limited supply of yearbook. The yearbook project team would like to apologize for the mix-up on senior quotes. You will find the quotes of George and Jurina have been switched on the final page of the printed book. Our online version which will be released shortly will have the correct quotes.

The Maharishi School 2020 yearbook was created using Printing Center USA printing services. To create your own print product, checkout www.printingcenterusa.com

 

Shristi Attends University of Iowa Hackathon

Shristi attended the University of Iowa Hackathon for high school students at North Liberty High School. This is the first hackathon of UoI for high schoolers. There were seven teams: five teams with four students each, one team with three students, and one all girls team of two students – Shristi and a 9th grader from North Liberty High School whom Shristi met the previous day and formed a group.

All teams were given time from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm to work on their projects and show to the judges at the end of the day. It was a fierce competition because other teams had senior and experienced programmers in their teams who worked on Big Data and Artificial Intelligence projects for this competition.

Suresh Sharma, Shristi’s father, had this to say:

“I was not expecting anything from Shristi’s team because they were competing against bigger and experienced teams. Shristi’s team was clueless when they started and in the beginning had no idea of the project, but finally, they came up with a very creative idea of creating an interactive map of major historical events during a specific period. Seeing the competition I was not expecting top three positions from Shristi’s team. I thought that if they were lucky, they might get a third place. When they announced the award, I was shocked and delighted that they got first place.”

Shristi and her teammate got first place because of the creativity, innovate thinking, and programming skills. It was a simple idea, but the judges hadn’t ever seen this type of thing before because it didn’t exist. The judges strongly encouraged Shristi to keep developing this idea and pitch this to Smithsonian. It was great and very satisfying to see Shristi’s progress.

 

-by Suresh Sharma

 

 

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Hannah Nichols
Marketing and PR
Maharishi School
hnichols@msae.edu
Fairfield, IA 52556

First of Its Kind for Maharishi School – Esports Victory

ESports Victory

Sage Cenatori is a true pioneer for the Maharishi School, recently bringing home the first place trophy from a tournament held at the WACO high school in Wayland, Iowa. This trophy is unique, not just because it was 3D printed during the competition, but because it was for an Esports tournament. Esports are video games that are played professionally and are generally watched by large audiences online and in person. Over 100 Universities and Colleges now offer athletic scholarships for budding Esport stars such as Sage, and many high school leagues have sprung up all around the country.

The Tournament

The recent tournament at WACO hosted 32 students from 8 different schools at their state-of-the-art Esports Arena. Students competed in a game called Fortnite which involves strategically building and battling their way to be the last player alive. Competitors have to protect themselves from their opponents while posturing for the high ground in a small arena. The battles are short, generally lasting about 5 minutes, but the action is blazingly fast.

Taking Home the Trophy

Drew Ayrit, the tournament organizer said Sage “dominated” the competition as Sage went undefeated through the bracket. Sage took home the first place honors along with his trophy and a specially designed gaming chair from Bytespeed who sponsored the event.

There was a clear buzz around Sage throughout the tournament as spectators and fellow students huddled close to watch as Sage methodically and creatively outsmart and outplay his opponents. Reaction times and hand-eye coordination are only part of the skill set necessary to be victorious. Much like traditional sports, there is a back and forth between opponents as they learn each other’s strengths and weaknesses and decide how to approach each strategically unique situation. No battle is the same and creativity and flexibility are essential to be victorious.

Number One Challenge 

After the tournament, Sage said that “the fear of losing” was his number one challenge and that he didn’t just get used to it or learn how to deal with it but clearly “overcame” it throughout the course of the day.

Sage comes home with a well-deserved victory, and the Maharishi School adds another avenue for showcasing the creativity, intelligence, and mental toughness of their students. Congratulations to Sage for this pioneering accomplishment and hopefully this is the first of many trophies to be brought home to the Maharishi School.
– written by Owen Blake

 

To learn more about our academics or to contact a member of our admissions staff, click here.

To learn more about school events and student life, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Hannah Nichols
Marketing and PR
Maharishi School
hnichols@msae.edu
Fairfield, IA 52556

Commitment to Iowa Scholarship

Private School can seem unattainable or unaffordable. We understand. We have some suggestions about how to make private school more affordable on another blog post. We are also really excited to tell you about a scholarship we offer to individuals who already live in Iowa and want to come to Maharishi School – our Commitment to Iowa Scholarship.

COMMITMENT TO IOWA SCHOLARSHIP

The Commitment to Iowa Scholarship will be awarded to a limited number of eligible applicants entering the 6th-12th grades. The award is based on both need and merit; the need is assessed by Financial Aid Independent Review (FAIR) and merit is evaluated based on the student’s application, GPA and prior school records. This scholarship can be awarded up to 4-years, based on the availability of funds, will cover up to 25% of tuition (minus a $300 deposit) for students in grades 6-12. To continue receiving the scholarship, the student must maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA and remain in good disciplinary standing. The parents of students receiving the Commitment to Iowa Scholarship must reside in Iowa. The parents must also commit to either volunteer at the School 40 hours/year or fundraise at least $400/year.

The CTI donor will support up to $50,000 in scholarship funds each year.

Apply

If you would like to apply for the Commitment to Iowa Scholarship, please contact a member of our admissions staff below.

 

To learn more about our academics or to contact a member of our admissions staff, click here.

To learn more about school events and student life, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Hannah Nichols
Marketing and PR
Maharishi School
hnichols@msae.edu
Fairfield, IA 52556