Tag Archive for: private school iowa

Exploring Iowa: Affordable Homes and Educational Opportunities

In the vast landscape of the United States, there are hidden gems that offer not only affordable living but also excellent educational opportunities. Nestled in the heartland is Iowa, a state renowned for its friendly communities, picturesque countryside, and now, surprisingly affordable housing. According to Homebuyer.com, Iowa boasts the lowest median home prices in the country, making it an attractive destination for families looking to settle down without breaking the bank.

Affordable Living in Iowa

The dream of homeownership is within reach for many in Iowa, where the median home price ranks as the lowest in the nation. This affordability opens doors for families seeking to establish roots in a welcoming community without sacrificing their financial stability. Whether you’re eyeing a cozy suburban home or a spacious rural retreat, Iowa offers a diverse range of housing options to suit every lifestyle and budget.

Education Savings Account (ESA) Vouchers: Enhancing Educational Choices

Beyond affordable housing, Iowa presents another compelling reason for families to consider making the move: the Iowa Education Savings Account (ESA) voucher program. Designed to empower parents with greater control over their children’s education, the Iowa ESA provide families with funds to cover tuition and other educational expenses, including private school fees.

For families prioritizing personalized learning experiences or seeking alternative educational approaches, Iowa’s ESA voucher program opens the door to a plethora of options. Private schools, renowned for their specialized curricula, smaller class sizes, and individualized attention, become accessible and affordable through this program.

Why Choose Private Schools in Iowa?

Iowa’s private schools offer more than just academic excellence; they cultivate a nurturing environment that prioritizes the holistic development of each student. With the flexibility afforded by ESA vouchers, families can select a school that aligns with their values, educational philosophy, and their child’s unique needs and interests. From STEM-focused curricula to arts-integrated learning, privatescience fair students schools in Iowa offer specialized programs designed to cater to diverse learning styles and interests.

Embracing a Bright Future in Iowa

As families contemplate their next chapter, Iowa emerges as a compelling destination offering a unique blend of affordability, community, and educational opportunity. With the lowest median home prices in the nation and the flexibility of ESA vouchers, Iowa provides the perfect backdrop for families to thrive and children to flourish.

Whether you’re drawn to the tranquil beauty of rural landscapes or the vibrant energy of urban centers, Iowa welcomes you with open arms and boundless opportunities. Embrace the promise of a brighter future for your family in the heartland, where affordable living and exceptional education converge to create a life worth celebrating.

 

middle school students

 

 

 

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Empowering Iowa Families: The Iowa Education Savings Voucher Opens Doors to Private Schools

In a significant stride towards educational inclusivity, Iowa has introduced the Education Savings Voucher program, providing qualifying families with the opportunity to access private schooling for theiriowa national honors children.

Benefits for Qualifying Families:

  1. Increased Choice and Customization: Families that meet the eligibility criteria now have the freedom to choose a private school that aligns with their values, educational philosophies, and the specific needs of their children. This increased choice fosters a more personalized approach to education, catering to diverse learning styles and preferences.
  2. Enhanced Educational Opportunities: Private schools often offer unique programs, specialized curricula, and smaller class sizes, providing students with an enriched and personalized learning experience. The Education Savings Voucher enables families to access these opportunities that may not be available in traditional public schools.
  3. Individualized Support: Private schools are renowned for their ability to provide individualized attention and support to students. With the voucher program, qualifying families can ensure that their children receive the attention they need to thrive academically, emotionally, and socially.
  4. Community Engagement: Private schools often foster tight-knit communities where parents, teachers, and students collaborate closely. The voucher program encourages active participation from parents in their child’s education, creating a supportive environment that extends beyond the classroom.

preschoolThe Iowa Education Savings Voucher is a commendable step towards democratizing education, providing families with the financial means to choose the educational path that best suits their children. This initiative not only enhances access to quality education but also contributes to a more diverse and competitive educational landscape. As Iowa continues to prioritize the educational well-being of its students, the ripple effects of this program are bound to shape a brighter future for generations to come.

To learn more about the Iowa Education Savings Voucher please go to https://educate.iowa.gov/pk-12/educational-choice/education-savings-account

middle school students

 

 

 

To learn more about the Maharishi School, click here.facebook and instagram

 

 

 

Learn more about school events and student life, follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

 

apply now

 

 

 

Ready to apply? Click here.

Restorative Justice in Maharishi School

What is restorative justice?

Restorative justice refers to a practice that empowers students to resolve conflicts on their own, in small groups that could be called ‘circle time’. Restorative justice is a growing practice at schools around the country. Essentially the idea is to bring students together in peer-mediated small groups to talk, ask questions, air their grievances, and discuss how to amend or make it right.

How did we find restorative justice for our school?

kaye jacob administrator of maharishi school

Our head of Middle and Upper School, Kaye Jacobs, is responsible for bringing restorative justice to Maharishi School. Kaye says, ” When I started to read Positive Discipline I thought, wow this makes a lot of sense! You actually work on empowering the student, which flips the way you look at their misbehavior, to get to the root of the problem.” The only thing Ms. Jacob’s felt was missing is the model that gave more structure for older children. Positive Discipline works well for younger kids but we needed a more structured model for older students.

postive discipline by Jane Nelson

Kaye realized that we needed the most help with Middle School students as they are at a complex phase where the triggers for defiance/misbehavior are more solidified than they have ever been before.

How can Maharishi School help?

Kaye wanted to give her teachers a method that systematically helps them get out of the pattern of punishment. This is where restorative justice comes in by creating a space to get the kids talking and sharing about a problem within the students in circle time restorative justice outsideclassroom. In this ‘circle time’, the kids talk reflectively about the problem while the conversation is led by the teacher. Kaye says, “the idea is to have these circle times frequently so the kids are adept at reflecting and know how to get into the mode of problem solving. This way when a problem happens they already know what to do. I want parents to understand that this is a work in progress! Parents should use restorative justice practices at home and consistently in order for it to be the most effective. We want the students themselves to feel like this is working for them too, as if to say “if I do this, then it goes better for me as the student.”

Lower and Middle School teachers have been reading a book called Hacking School Discipline by Brad Weinstein. The book makes the case for establishing expectations rather than rules and for holding students intrinsically accountable to the group for their actions and behaviors.

hacking school disciplineExample of restorative justice from Hacking School Discipline:

Suddenly two Middle School girls get into a physical altercation during class. The teacher immediately separates them from the class and sends them to the principal’s office. Then the teacher calls “circle time” with the rest of the class. The teacher will ask the class, “how did that make you feel?” and then the students have an opportunity to speak about how their learning was disrupted, or that they were scared, or upset. The teacher is resetting the classroom culture.

The teacher will go to the girls who fought and talk to them separately, asking “are you ready to talk to each other again?” and bring them back into the classroom. Once the girls are ready, the teacher will create the rules for the restoration process. Some of the rules could include saying “if you get too hot or angry then you can step out of the room, but you have to come back  in when you’re ready.“ Eventually the teacher can talk about what led to the flare up not by saying “why did you do that” but “how were you feeling before you got into a place of fighting?”restorative justice

The last piece of this restorative justice sample is led by the teacher. She turns to the two girls and says “how do you think this fight has affected the rest of the class and myself, your teacher?” This puts the girls who fought into self reflection mode on a broader scale of including the whole environment in the classroom. Then the restoration happens, not just between the two girls but everyone involved. After this, the girls get welcome back into their classroom and that is the goal of restorative justice!

What is the future of restorative justice for our students?

We often understand that the kids who are acting out come from unsettled home environments. Perhaps the parents are separated or going through a divorce. These are what set the context for a child who is misbehaving. They’re not acting out of isolation, they are acting because something else in the broader context of their lives is troubling them. Misbehavior is a default way to deflect those troubles.

If a child feels dis-empowered in one place, then they will deflect that behavior into the school setting, or with friends. Restorative justice is trying to avoid this deflection by empowering students to reflect and make the right choices. Restorative justice practices in school create a pattern of teachers relating to students then getting them to take down their defenses so a conversation can happen. If the action/upset happened in a classroom setting, then the restoration needs to happen there, too.

We don’t have all the answers but we want to be consistent in school and hope that things at home will improve. It’s almost always the case that there’s something in the student’s life that feels out of their control – something they can’t understand. Some trauma that they can’t digest. At school we inevitably get to see their reactions to this and our desire is to help break the cycle. The student may not even be able to articulate how they feel but we believe restorative justice practices empower our students without playing into the victim mentality.restorative justice tree of knowledge

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