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Senior Pranav Chhalliyil Attending World’s Largest International Pre-College Science Competition

On May 12th – 17th the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF), a program of the Society for Science & the Public, and the world’s largest international pre-college science competition, will be held in Phoenix, Arizona.

Maharishi School Senior Pranav Chhalliyil will be attending Intel ISEF for his fifth consecutive year. Pranav was also recently named Honorary Grand Champion at the State Science and Technology Fair of Iowa, and received an award for 6 years of participation. A total of 5 students are representing the State of Iowa as finalists at Intel ISEF.

Pranav’s project is titled:  “DNA Sequencing of Soil Microbiota From Mulching – A Novel Rotational Fragment Farming for Efficient Agriculture”

“The idea for this project came from my previous research experience on the oral microbiota,” Pranav said,  “which triggered a curiosity on the soil microbiota when I had interesting observations while gardening. I found a higher yield of flowers and vegetables, as well as a higher tolerance to winter frost in perennials after introducing mulching in my home garden.”His project uses DNA sequencing to look at the thousands of bacteria and fungi species which brought diversity in the soil and increased soil fertility.

The Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF) unites the top young scientific minds, showcasing their talents on an international stage, where doctoral-level scientists review and judge their work.

Each year, approximately 1,800 high school students from more than 75 countries, regions, and territories are awarded the opportunity to showcase their independent research and compete for on average $5 million in prizes at Intel ISEF. The competition focuses on identifying, inspiring, and engaging the world’s next STEM generation.

Millions of students in grades 9-12 worldwide compete each year in local and school-sponsored science fairs. The winners of these events go on to participate in 420 Society-affiliated regional and state fairs, from which the top projects are selected and receive opportunity to attend Intel ISEF. Each affiliated fair may send a pre-determined number of projects to Intel ISEF to compete in 22 different categories.

Intel ISEF alumni have gone on to receive some of the world’s most esteemed academic honors, including the Nobel Prize, Breakthrough Prize, three National Medals of Science, and six MacArthur Foundation Fellowships and have been involved in some of the most groundbreaking scientific research.

Congratulations to Pranav and we wish him the best of luck!

To learn more about what makes Maharishi School students like Pranav so successful click here.

For more information and updates on Maharishi School and our students follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Regeneron Science Talent Search

Regeneron Science Talent Search

Pranav Chhaliyil named as Regeneron Science Talent Search scholar and Ms. Barbara Hays, the Teacher of Merit.

On January 9, the Society for Science & the Public named the top scholars of the Regeneron Science Talent Search, the nation’s oldest and most prestigious pre-college science competition. The Regeneron Science Talent Search, a program of the Society for Science & the Public, recognizes and empowers the most promising young scientists in the U.S. who are creating the ideas and solutions that solve our most urgent challenges. The Society for Science & the Public and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals have announced Pranav Chhaliyil as one of the 300 high school seniors named as Regeneron Science Talent Search scholars. Pranav is a senior at the Maharishi School, Fairfield, Iowa to receive this great honor. His mentor and teacher Ms. Barbara Hays also was nominated as the “Teacher of Merit” by Regeneron.

The selection as scholar is a great honor, and signifies talent and promise in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. These scholars join a distinguished group of alumni that includes Nobel Prize winners, MacArthur Fellows, entrepreneurs and innovators who, were named among the top 300 competitors in this program as seniors in high school.

Regeneron Science Talent Search scholarEach scholar, selected from 1,964 entrants, receives a $2,000 award with an additional $2,000 going to his or her respective school, resulting in $1.2 million in total scholar awards from Regeneron.

The scholars, who hail from 184 American and international high schools from 38 U.S. states, the District of Columbia and two countries abroad, were selected from an applicant pool of nearly 2,000 students. Each of the 300 scholars and their schools will be awarded $2,000.

Pranav’s Findings

Pranav from his 7th grade had been involved in scientific research on oral microbiome. Last year he conducted research on the effect of sugar causing dental damage and was curious to know if white sugar or unprocessed brown-sugar made any difference. To his surprise, he found that eating unrefined sugar is good for preventing systemic diseases like eating unrefined starches like whole grains. The balance of good and bad bacteria of the oral microbiome was significantly disturbed with white sugar. However while eating unrefined sugar, which is rich in polyphenols, prevented biofilm formation in the tooth.

“I actually invented a new mouthwash that’s rich in polyphenols and it includes my previously developed Nano charcoal. Middle school children volunteered to be his subjects for the research involving DNA sequencing of oral microbiota. The subjects who ate porridge that contained the white sugar got protection from the early colonizers by using the mouthwash.” He plans to commercialize the product as a healthier alternative, Pranav explained.

We Are All Proud

“We’re very proud of him, he set a great example to other students because he is not only highly achieved, but we see the support that he gives to his peers here at the school as well. He has kept his feet on the ground. So, just deep pride,” said Dr. Richard Beall, Maharishi School Principal.

Pranav has some words of advice for students. “Never belittle your small ideas that popup in your brain. If you think how it will help others, it will magically self-develop and will impact the lives of many people more than you can think of. “I always believe that in order for you to succeed, it’s important for you to also give back,” said Pranav.

 

To learn more about our academics or to contact a member of our admissions staff, click here.

To learn more about school events and student life, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Hannah Nichols
Marketing and PR
Maharishi School
hnichols@msae.edu
Fairfield, IA 52556

So Your Child is Attending Private School – Here’s How to Prepare

So you are planning to send your child to private school next year? You are probably feeling nervous. You are probably wondering if your child is nervous. You worry that there might be something you forget or overlook because you can’t anticipate everything that might be different about private school. All of this is normal. Don’t worry, regardless of where your child plans to attend school, everyone wants you as prepared as possible. No question is a new question. Hopefully the information that follows is helpful to ease some worry and anxiety!

 

What to Wear

Private schools tend to have dress codes. Most are fairly simple, but some require clothing with the school logo. If the school your child is attending requires a specific logo or emblem on the clothing, they will direct you to the place you can purchase this article of clothing. For example, at Maharishi School, we go through Lands’ End for our school uniforms. We provide a special link to our uniforms

 

What to Bring

Just like at public school, private schools have school supply lists. Each grade level at each school is slightly different, but they lists tend to be predictable. Older kids need special calculators; younger kids need crayons and colored pencils. None of that is a surprise. Feel free to view our supply list as an example. We have a few lists for our different age groups.

 

What to Expect

Each private school is different. Each school starts on a slightly different date, but usually in August or September. Usually there are a few different school breaks throughout the year. There are different extracurricular activities for each school. The best place to turn is your school’s calendar. It will give you the best picture of what is going on throughout the school year, what dates to put on your calendar, and when events take place.

Although the atmosphere within each school is different, expect private schools to be a little smaller, to have a tight knit community, and to have it’s own sort of dynamic. One thing you should absolutely expect is to feel welcomed by your school, to feel at home, and to feel included. If you are not feeling like this within your school, please consider it the school’s mistake, not your own. There are other options out there. Read about one here.

In summary, private schools are different but not that different. There are many, many benefits to private schooling, and each one is unique. However, all schools are here to educate. That is the important thing to remember. Take comfort knowing that everything will be okay. To be prepared, read the material your school provides. If you have questions, ask them. Make sure you feel welcome and included in your schools community.

 

To learn more about our academics or to contact a member of our admissions staff, click here.

To learn more about school events and student life, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Hannah Nichols
Marketing and PR
Maharishi School
hnichols@msae.edu
Fairfield, IA 52556

How Do We Put Passion Back into Education?

Passion In Work

The other day, I was filling out some paperwork, organizing some things in my office, and working on a project that wasn’t the most exciting to be doing. It was hard to focus, but I had so much to get done. Now, I am an adult, but I had a hard time getting all my work done. I had a hard time focusing, and I struggled to manage my time. Eventually, everything got done, but it got me thinking about how we ask children and teens to do this all the time in school (or most schools and teachers do). We ask them to complete work, focus on subjects, sit still, learn, and to do it all in a timely manner. However, a lot of students resist. Most end up doing their work, but even those students would likely do better if we approached education in a different way.

In both my situation and the educational expectations of our kids, the thing that often is lacking is passion. I had no passion for the tasks I was doing. Similarly, students often lack passion for what they are learning and the work required of them.

How Do We Fix What is Missing?

So how do we convince kids to excel at the tasks, assignments, and subjects they learn? Passion. Passion is the solution. We have to either 1) show kids how to be passionate about the subjects they are learning or 2) provide space in education for each student to pursue their passion. Both of these solutions are valuable and possible. However, it is likely easier to cultivate the natural passions of a student rather than ask them to adjust their passions, though it may be necessary to ask them to adjust occasionally.

One model of education that allows for the students’ own passions is Project-Based Learning. In Project-Based Learning, Every day students are given time (70 minutes at Maharishi School) to work on a passion project. They problem-solve, experiment, falter and keep striving. Through the process, they learn real-world skills that will serve them when they are adults working on projects at their workplaces. Some of the Learning Goals for project learning are creativity, collaboration, communication, critical thinking, a growth mindset, societal impact and service, interdisciplinary integration, development of student portfolios.

Passion in Education

Not only does Project-Based Learning let the students figure out what they love, allow them to pursue their passions, equip them with essential skills, and show them their passions matter; it also helps them move forward in life by strengthening their portfolios for college and their resumes for future employment.

Project-Based Learning really is an amazing option for our students. We only want to see them excel, to reach their own goals, and to self-manage. This is an excellent way to learn those skills.

 

To learn more about our academics or to contact a member of our admissions staff, click here.

To learn more about school events and student life, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Hannah Nichols
Marketing and PR
Maharishi School
hnichols@msae.edu
Fairfield, IA 52556

Success – How Do We Measure It?

All the Talk About Success

We all talk about success a lot. We all feel the pressure to succeed, and depending on our reaction to the pressure, we handle our own level of success very differently. Success means something different to everyone. Some measure success by monetary standards. Some measure it by name recognition or fame. Maybe the problem with success isn’t the different ways we define it but how we measure it.

Two Ways to Measure

At Maharishi School, we measure success in two ways.

The way we look at success is by considering inner development and outer achievement. While outer achievement is exciting and worthwhile, it is empty without inner development. We can measure our inner development in two ways. The first way we measure success is by looking at our failures. There will always be failures and setbacks on the path to success. The only way to reach our goals is to be tenacious, persistent, and to learn from that failure. Some of the best and hardest to learn lessons come in moments of failure. Without those moments, we may never find the depth of our success. The second way to measure the inner development of our success is by finding a way to be passionate about what we are doing.

We encourage students to be their own best. Of course, our students are graded on their work. However, they are also encouraged to be themselves, find their own success – failure included – and be passionate about whatever they are drawn toward.

Success looks different for everyone. We encourage our students to find out what it means for them.

To learn more about our academics or to contact a member of our admissions staff, click here.

To learn more about school events and student life, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Hannah Nichols
Marketing and PR
Maharishi School
hnichols@msae.edu
Fairfield, IA 52556

What Does It Mean to “Think Deeply?”

Think Deeply – What Does It Mean?

As humans, we are all capable of advanced and deep thoughts. It’s part of what makes us human. There have been many different theories or gurus or instructors that show us a way to think more deeply than we previously were able to do. Some people are drawn to one way of deep thinking over the other. Of course, we have our preference too. We love the Transcendental Meditation® (TM) technique.

But! What does it mean to think deeply in terms of school curriculum? How does that change the way we educate our students? What does it mean to corporately, as a group, seek to think deeper? Let’s try to answer these questions.

What Thinking Deeper Means to Us

To us, thinking deeper means going beyond what is happening right now. That means we take time to show the interconnectivity of everything around us. We take time to think past the next assignment, the next class period, the next school year. We think in terms of success far past high school, into adulthood, and even after we are finished living this life.

We want to connect learning to application. What good are our scholastics and achievements if we can’t use them past our classes? This is why we teach Science of Creative Intelligence, an interdisciplinary course that reaches outside the classroom to show how observable and interconnected the things we learn truly are. SCI teaches our students that math isn’t just equations but the rhythm by which the earth shifts, the birds sing, and flowers bloom. It shows us that chemistry isn’t something that exists within a test tube but is found in life itself, all around us. Students make connections between all the surface details and the big ideas.
We have a saying, “stretched not stressed,” for our students. We want to see them challenged, to set expectations for themselves, then to exceed those expectations. We provide opportunities for this in our rigorous AP exams and Honors classes.

In SCI classes, students learn that the laws of real-world science are the same laws that guide human growth. For example, one of the principles is: Every action has a reaction. In science, we see this in literally everything. If temperatures rise on our planet, that means drastic changes for many species. A small change in one part of the world can lead to a ripple effect globally as in the butterfly effect. In the same way, every action has a reaction in our lives. The words we use, the actions we take, and the education we embrace all have an effect. By understanding this principle in depth, students see the power they carry and are able to better understand the mechanics of not only the physical world but also the mechanics of their behavior and life. They learn these simple but powerful truths starting in Kindergarten and continue to find them useful and visible throughout their lives.

Thinking Deeply Into the Future

More than anything, we want to prepare our students to weather the storms their lives will present and to come out on the other side successful, resilient, and better prepared for next time. Whatever goals our students set for themselves – college, career, life – we believe the depths of their thoughts and the ability to live a balanced life will be their launching point for success.

To learn more about our academics or to contact a member of our admissions staff, click here.

To learn more about school events and student life, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Hannah Nichols
Marketing and PR
Maharishi School
hnichols@msae.edu
Fairfield, IA 52556

What Does it Mean to be a Team?

 

What is a team?

Most people would describe a team as something that would resemble their high school football team. They aren’t wrong, however, teams also look like the group of people you work with, the committee of people you volunteer with, or any group of people working together toward one goal. For students, that might mean their speech team or people they’re working with on a project or anything along those lines. However we define a team, the reality is that most of us cannot avoid teamwork, regardless of age. This makes the ability to work as a team a valuable skill to have.

Why be part of a team?

Have you or your child ever struggled in a team setting? Maybe they had a hard time finding a role they could fill on their soccer team when they were five. Maybe they clashed with a coach. Maybe they preferred working alone on projects or got frustrated when the whole group wasn’t sharing an equal workload. These are difficult complications of teamwork. It makes us want to give up, quit, or just do the whole project ourselves so we don’t have to fuss over anyone else. But, what if the most important part of teamwork is that push and pull? What if even more than the grade or winning or outcome, coming up against the challenges of teamwork was the most important thing about working together?

There are a lot of advantages to succeeding alone: set your own goals, plan it out yourself, no need to coordinate schedules, the burden of success or failure is all your own. Working in a group setting comes with a whole new layer of responsibility, struggle, and balance. Through that layer of complication, we have to learn to work with and alongside people we don’t like, don’t agree with, and don’t really want to work with. Evenmoreso, we win or lose with those people. There is no other setting we can, with others, learn to celebrate our success and mourn our loss than in some form of teamwork.

Losing, in particular, is hard. When we lose as a team, we try to find who to blame:

“I should have played more; we would have won.”

“I should have been in charge of designing our project. We would have gotten a better grade.”

“She’s terrible at drawing. I don’t know why they let her do it and not me.”

“Had I been in charge, things would have turned out better.”

“He is a terrible boss. I should have gotten that promotion. I would do a better job.”

None of these thoughts are original. We all try to figure what went wrong, why we lost, or whose fault it was. It’s normal. It is hard to be judged as an entity, especially if you don’t get to pick who else is in that group, instead of as an individual. When we are judged or measured as an individual, we have control over that. We are able to control ourselves and, therefore, the outcome. If nothing else when we fail on our own, we know whose fault it is.

When we lose as a team, we have to accept the unknown. We have to realize some things are out of our control. We have to realize that even though we tried our best, some things might not go our way, we might not get the recognition we deserve, and we might be blamed for things that weren’t our fault. Even as adults, this is something we have to deal with. Maybe we work with a team at our place of employment and one team member slows down progress or maybe we don’t like a colleague who doesn’t pull their weight around the office. Whatever the case, regardless of age, teamwork is not going away so we might as well have the skills to navigate that reality.

Guess how to gain and improve that skill set needed to navigate teamwork? Yep, you have to work as a team.

Are there benefits to being part of a team?

Of course, there are benefits to working as a team. The idea of teamwork is a great solution when a project is too big for one person, when a sport can’t be played with only one participant, when more can be accomplished more quickly with multiple people, etc. However, the biggest benefit of working in a group is just learning how to do that, is just the act of working together regardless of all other variables. Whether it be a tennis team, golf team, football team, speech team, robotics team, or team at work, there is value in the experience of working together. Win together, lose together, but most of all, try together.

To learn more about our academics or to contact a member of our admissions staff, click here.

To learn more about school events and student life, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Hannah Nichols
Marketing and PR
Maharishi School
hnichols@msae.edu
Fairfield, IA 52556

The Parent-Teacher Struggle and a Solution

The Struggle

There is an age-old struggle that anyone who has ever attended school or been a parent of a person who attended school is familiar with. No, not the struggle between good and evil, that’s for another blog post, but the struggle between parents and teachers, which ends up being a struggle between good and good. The struggle between parents and teachers tends to be a break down of communication. Thankfully, here at Maharishi School, we think we have the solution.

I am going to give you a few scenarios. You let me know if any of these sound familiar.

“What?! This project is due tomorrow?! Why is this the first time I am hearing that you need 37 different colored pencils, 4 rolls of aluminum foil, and 2 bags of light green, fake moss?” Then you spend the next 3 hours going to every store within reasonable driving distance (read 1.5 hours radius) that MIGHT have fake moss.

“What do you mean you have only been wearing one shoe to school for the last 6 months?”

“Honey, I just got an email inviting me to a student art showcase this Friday. In the email is says it is YOUR WORK BEING SHOWCASED! How is this the first time I am hearing about this?”

Any of that ring any bells? Yeah, me too. Sounds pretty familiar.

The Solution

Well, we decided it was time to strengthen the communication between teachers and parents because we are all on the same team here. We want our students to succeed. You want your kids to be passionate, to do well in school, to be well adjusted, and to have the ability to dream big and achieve those dreams. So that gave us an idea. What do teachers and parents have in common? THE STUDENTS! Our overlap is our students, your kids – one in the same. We concluded that the solution to the communication break down was the students. This probably isn’t a surprise to anyone. We put notes in kids’ backpacks. We send them home with information to pass along to their parents. Etc. But what if we put the students in charge of the information? What if we let the students decide the most important parts of what they are learning? What if we let the students decide where they are struggling each quarter? What if we enabled the students, gave them the proper tools and supported them, to be in charge of their own information?

Student-Led Conferences This the the paradigm shift that brought us to Student-Led Conferences. In student-led conferences, students, parents, and teachers meet together to discuss what the student has picked out. They talk about successes and failures, triumphs and the lessons they learned; they set goals and plan to reach them. To read more about our most recent Student-Led Conferences, click here.

Although this is still a learning experience for us and there are still improvements to be made, we think this is the road to a solution. When we give our kids the power and ability to be take responsibility, we continually see them live up to their own expectations (because they set the expectations) and go beyond. Student-Led Conferences encourage students to self-regulate, to self-adjust, and to communicate. Let’s just say that again: our kids COMMUNICATE! That includes our quiet teenagers too. Read some of our parent and student experiences here.

Empower Our Kids

Our solution boils down to the idea that we don’t want to demand our students to comply with the things we ask them to do; instead, we empower them to put value on things that are important to them and communicate that value to the people around them. Isn’t that an important skill set to have? We believe this empowerment leads to our students’ success because it let’s them decide what ignited their passion, let’s them focus on that passion, and allows them to plan a path to their own success. From the beginning, they took ownership of their own success. That’s powerful.

To learn more about our academics or to contact a member of our admissions staff, click here.

To learn more about school events and student life, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Hannah Nichols
Marketing and PR
Maharishi School
hnichols@msae.edu
Fairfield, IA 52556

It’s Okay to be Weird

High School Can be Weird

High School is a weird time. In high school, we deal with the pressure to fit in, to be good at sports – or to be good at something, to get good grades, and to have fun. On top of that, we’re expected to act like adults, with a lot of the responsibilities of adults, but none of the benefits of being an adult. Maybe we even deal with heartbreak or our sexual identity in high school. That’s a lot. High school is one of the busiest times of our lives.

These are hard things to address because they are so abstract. There’s no real solution because there’s no real problem in such that there’s nothing wrong with going through these events or feeling these pressures. However, these pressures have an emotional weight, an emotional tax. So, how do we lift that weight, get a break for that tax?

Managing Our Stress

One way we manage these stressors at Maharishi School is by practicing the Transcendental Meditation technique. The TM technique is an easy way to relieve stress. There’s a lot of research about the health benefits of reducing stress through the TM technique. Read more about that on TM.org.

Though the TM technique is backed by years of research and countless stories of the relief and aid it provides, it also can seem a bit weird. From the outside, people who practice the TM technique can seem like they are just a little different. Until recent years, it was a subculture with roots in India and connections to Holland with a hub here in Fairfield, Iowa. It was a hard thing to explain, and still can be, but people are more familiar and accepting of the Transcendental Meditation technique.

TM Might Make You Weird, but That’s a Good Thing

One of our alumna, Jennie Rothenberg, came back to speak at graduation last year. In her speech, she addressed feeling weird, or having the experience of having to explain growing up in this meditating community for the rest of our lives, actually might be a positive experience. Maybe it always hasn’t been so, but now it is a good way to set ourselves apart from the rest of the crowd, the rest of the job applicants, the rest of the people running for public office, the people applying for that scholarship, and so on. Watch the video to hear Jennie’s speech.

Another benefit of practicing the TM technique, though arguable less measurable, is learning that it is okay to be weird. It is okay to stand out. It is okay to be “the only one” in a crowd. Though we have a supportive and close community, eventually we leave this nest to experience different parts of the world, maybe even different cultures. However, something we will always have is our de-stressor, our weirdness, our ability to stand out, and our inner stillness – Transcendental Meditation.

So go ahead. It’s okay to be weird.

To learn more about our academics or to contact a member of our admissions staff, click here.

To learn more about school events and student life, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Hannah Nichols
Marketing and PR
Maharishi School
hnichols@msae.edu
Fairfield, IA 52556

Failure Breeds Success

Success and Failure

Let’s look at success holistically, rather than the ultimate and exclusive goal for our kids. What does it mean to be successful? At Maharishi School, we would argue that success is often measured in the moments surrounding failure. When failure occurs, what happened right before and right after that event? Moments before we failed, did we do everything we possibly could have to have the best likelihood of reaching our goals? In the moments after failure, could we tell what went wrong, did we learn anything, does this event spur us on to a bigger goal? The answers to these questions decide whether failure is something that squashes us, our passion, and our drive -or- leads us to a deeper, more thorough, and longer lasting understanding of ourselves, our goals, and our passions.

Read below to see how Maharishi School’s Robotics stood in the face of failure…and found success.

Small Failuresby Carol Chesnutt, Director of Enrollment Management

Perhaps I was standing too close when I overhead the phone calls in Maharishi School’s Central Office.

“Fei Hung is missing from school today.”

“Is Steve at home sick today?”

“Tom didn’t show up for school today. (pause) Is Tom on the same robotics team with Fei and Steve?”

I’ll admit I was a bit giddy when I heard that Fei and her 2 robotics teammates were “home sick” 2 days before the state robotics competition. Software updates had created havoc with their robot. The students weren’t home with a fever: they were scrambling to fix the problem.

Why did their tense situation give me a thrill? My first 20+ year career was in management consulting helping large corporations either fix complex problems or innovate their business. Clients paid high fees and expected results in a compressed timeline. The most successful consultants never grimaced at a tight timeline and didn’t shrink when the project came up against obstacles – which happened regularly. They dug in and worked the problem. When I see students digging in, I know they’re learning and developing ‘grit’ in a relatively low-risk environment.

“Small failures, when the stakes are relatively low and the potential for emotional and cognitive growth is high, are what psychologists Elizabeth and Robert Bjork call ‘desirable difficulties.’ Learning that comes with challenge is stored more effectively and more durably in the brain than learning that comes easily.” Jessica Lahey

Teachers at Maharishi School embrace difficulties and small failures. Learning from failures not only ‘sticks’ better, it creates resiliency and humility – desirable traits for students and management consultants alike.

By the way, the state robotics competition didn’t go well for Fei, Steve, and Tom. The software issues never got resolved. But without question, I’d hire any of those 3 kids for a consulting team.

The Future of Failure

robotics

We have complete faith these kids will go far in whatever education or career path they choose. No one doubts that. When failure came their way, their end goals suddenly were even closer to their grasps. Did they win a robotics competition? No, but they did learn a real-world lesson: stuff goes wrong, sometimes that is out of your control regardless of how hard you work or how well prepared you are, you’re just going to have to deal with that. Inevitably, these students learned that lesson better through their failure than if anyone had tried to explain that to them. The future of their failure is success.

 

To learn more about our academics or to contact a member of our admissions staff, click here.

To learn more about school events and student life, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Hannah Nichols
Marketing and PR
Maharishi School
hnichols@msae.edu
Fairfield, IA 52556